Why Our Salmon: Sustainability

Pride of Bristol Bay sockeye salmon is sustainably harvested in one of the purest ecosystems left on earth — Bristol Bay, Alaska. In fact, the Bristol Bay Salmon Management Plan, overseen by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, is recognized as one of the most effective and comprehensive management regimes in the world. In Bristol Bay, it is known as the cornerstone of resource stewardship. Not only does it cultivate and protect the region’s salmon, but it includes the support of all species in the ecosystem, forever.
For more information on the Bristol Bay Salmon Management Plan, click here.
While fishing season is only a few short months, our crew ensures the highest quality salmon will be delivered to your door. Otherwise, we offer a handful of buying clubs around the U.S. The entire process — from catching the fish to shipping it nationwide, Pride of Bristol Bay is proud of the salmon you receive. If you’re interested, you can read posts about Bristol Bay, our fishing season, and what is going on with pebble mine by visiting prideofbristolbay.com.
In the meantime, we’d like to announce our two brand new buying clubs! This September, you will find us in the Midwest. On September 18th, we’ll be in Rochester, MN, and on September 21st, we’ll be in Cedar Rapids, IA.
Here’s to sustainably harvested, wild caught sockeye salmon! Reserve your share today.
Bristol Bay

FEATURED ARTICLE: My Search for the World’s Best Salmon

By, John O’Connor with Gene Food

In light of the very real concerns about the farming methods used to raise most of the “Atlantic Salmon” you find in the grocery stores (and on restaurant menus), how can consumers find salmon they can trust?

I did a little research to come up with some answers.

Bristol Bay is Your Place for Salmon

And as I read more about where the best US salmon comes from, Bristol Bay Alaska kept coming up again and again. Turns out Bristol Bay is fed by multiple relatively pristine river systems that are home to a number of wild salmon species. The region has been called the “crown jewel” of the American commercial fishing industry, and at least historically, the eco system is sustainable. Even accounting for the 61 million salmon it pulls from the region each year, the fishing industry in Bristol Bay doesn’t decimate the salmon population, they still make their way from the ocean to the rivers and streams where they were born to spawn and reproduce with enough fervor to keep the whole machine churning.4

It’s an incredible system for both the natives, who benefit from the 480 million in annual revenue, as well as the fish population, which has been protected to a degree from environmental encroachment. Unfortunately, Trump administration roll backs of previous EPA protections, could pave the way for a massive gold and copper mine in Bristol Bay that many believe would ruin one of America’s last great natural fisheries. The decision as to whether protections will be rescinded is pending before the EPA.5

The EPA published a massive document analyzing the state of the Bristol Bay fishing industry, complete with an estimation of the environmental impact of the proposed mine. I’ve dropped in some of the highlights below:

  • The Bristol Bay watershed supports large carnivore species which rely on salmon, such as brown bears and wolves.
  • All five species of Pacific salmon: sockeye, Chinook, coho, chum and pink, are living in Bristol Bay as are 29 other native fish species.
  • Of the 31 native Alaskan villages in the region, an estimated 25 depend on the salmon industry for their economic survival. Bristol Bay salmon is to Alaska what the car industry is to Detroit.

At the end of the day, I picked a company called the Pride of Bristol Bay for my order. I reached out to them direct for an informal interview and published the results from Steve, the owner of the operation, below. Can’t say the answers were all that insightful, but there are some nuggets here, especially as it pertains to water quality in Bristol Bay. Essentially, the waters, which are free of industry and always have been, are pristine, but that all changes once that copper mine goes in…

Click here for the full article from Gene Food.