Winter Citrus Butter Salmon

WINTER CITRUS BUTTER SALMON
Total time:
30 MINS
INGREDIENTS
  • 1 garlic clove minced
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon freshly grated lemon zest
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 blood orange thinly sliced
HERB BUTTER
  •  tablespoons unsalted butter melted
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh herbs basil, oregano, sage, thyme, etc
  • pinch of salt
WINTER CITRUS SALSA
  • 1 blood orange segmented and chopped
  • 1 cara cara orange segmented and chopped
  • 1 small shallot diced
  • 1/2 jalapeno pepper seeded and diced
  • 2 tablespoons fresh chopped cilantro
  • juice of 1 lime
  • pinch of salt and pepper
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Preheat the broiler in your oven to high and set the oven rack about 6 inches below it.
  2. Place the salmon on a baking sheet. In a bowl, stir together the brown sugar, salt, pepper, garlic and lemon zest. Add the olive oil to make a wet rub. Rub the mixture all over the salmon. Place the blood orange slices on top.
  3. Broil the salmon for 6 to 8 minutes, or until just opaque and flakey with a fork. Drizzle with the herb butter and serve with the winter citrus salsa.

 

*Recipe and Photo by Jessica Merchant

https://www.howsweeteats.com/2017/01/winter-citrus-butter-salmon/

Know your fish: The Sockeye Lifecycle

Know your fish: The Sockeye Lifecycle

The 2019 fishing season was the sixth largest run of all time (Bristol Bay Fishing Report, 2019). The preseason forecast called for a run of 40.2 million sockeye with an actual return of 56.3 million, that is 33% higher than predicted, can you envision what an additional 16 million salmon look like? With such impressive numbers on a large scale, it is easy to overlook the equally impressive life cycle that each individual sockeye has in common.

The name Sockeye comes from a rough translation of the name Suk-Kegh, originating from the Pacific Northwest’s native coast Salish language dating back as far as 6,000 years ago, meaning “red fish.” Sockeye are also known as “blueback salmon” because during their time spent in the ocean they sport a metallic green-blue back which contrasts against their white bellies. And, of course, they are prized for their succulent, bright orange meat. As sockeye return to their spawning grounds, they go through an incredible transformation resulting in a vivid red bodies with bright green heads, hence the name “red salmon.” Males develop a humped back and hooked jaw that differentiates them from the females. This is the final stage in their life cycle.

Now, let’s take a look at the journey that got us here:

  • Sockeye return to spawn in June and July into freshwater river systems and lakes. 
  • Females dig small cavities in the sand and gravel called “redds” with their tails over several days, into which they deposit 2,000-5,000 eggs. Males then swim over these eggs and fertilize them. Both males and females die within a few weeks of spawning.
  •  The eggs hatch in the winter and the “alevins” remain in the gravel, feeding from their yolk sacks until they grow into “fry” and move into rearing areas. Fry will spend one to three years feeding on zooplankton in freshwater lakes. If there are no lakes, the juveniles will travel to the ocean immediately after coming out of the gravel
  • By now the young fish have grown into “smolts,” each weighing a few ounces; they are ready to make their springtime journey into the ocean. 
  • As soon as the fish enter salt water, they begin to experience rapid growth. Sockeye will spend up to five years in the ocean, travelling thousands of miles swimming in the counterclockwise current of the Gulf of Alaska. An adult sockeye can range between 18 and 31 inches and a weight of 4 to 15 pounds.

As mature salmon begin to return to their river systems in June and July, they are ready to be harvested. Tribal and First Nation groups depend on salmon returns not only for subsistence, but many ceremonial aspects of their lives as well. The Alaskan fishing industry also depends on strong salmon runs which can be seen in the thousands of jobs and millions of dollars contributed to the economies of both Canada and the United States. The looming Pebble mine is a direct threat to indigenous people and all Bristol Bay fisheries by potentially having a catastrophic effect on salmon populations, which would directly impact the lives of thousands of people.

Making their way upstream is the final step after their arduous journey, and as the sockeye lay their eggs, another life cycle begins. The mature sockeye die and their bodies provide nutrients that feed the developing salmon, insects, and aquatic plant life. An entire ecosystem, including bears and eagles are supported by spawning salmon…how can we not protect them?

Roasted Veggies and Salmon

MUSTARD MAPLE SALMON WITH ROASTED VEGETABLES

INGREDIENTS

VEGETABLES:

4 to 6 Potatoes  (about 4 oz.), washed and cut into pieces

2 medium Zucchini, thick-sliced

2 medium Yellow carrots, peeled and sliced

2 medium Orange carrots, peeled and sliced

2 Tablespoons olive oil

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon garlic powder

1/2 to 1 teaspoon pepper

SALMON:

2 Tablespoons olive oil

2 Tablespoons maple syrup

2 Tablespoons Dijon-style mustard

1 Tablespoon poultry seasoning

2 garlic cloves, minced

4  Alaska salmon fillets (6 oz. each), fresh, frozen or thawed – purchase from Pride of Bristol Bay here.

Recipe by Bruce Bush, Bushes Bunches Farm, Palmer, Alaska.

DIRECTIONS

VEGETABLES:

Preheat oven to 450°F.  Place cut vegetables in a large zip-top bag; add oil, salt, garlic powder and pepper.  Seal bag; turn bag over several times to coat.  Spread vegetables evenly onto a large baking sheet.  Roast in oven for 15 minutes.

SALMON:

1. While vegetables are roasting, whisk olive oil, maple syrup, mustard, poultry seasoning and garlic in a small bowl. 

2. If using frozen Alaska salmon, rinse fillets under cold running water to remove any ice glaze.  Pat dry with paper towels.  Coat salmon with mustard-maple mixture.

3. Remove baking sheet from oven; turn vegetables over with spatula, then move vegetables closer together, making room to add salmon.

4. Place fillets on sheet; return to oven.  Cook additional 15 minutes for frozen salmon or 10 to 12 minutes for fresh/thawed, just until salmon is opaque throughout.

5. To serve, portion one-fourth of the vegetables with a salmon fillet.

** Recipe from alaskaseafood.org**

Living aboard in Bristol Bay- An insider’s view

Have you ever wondered what it is like to be a commercial fisherman in Bristol Bay, or thought you might like to actually sign on as a deckhand? While it certainly is not the experience for everybody, for the fishermen who spend their summers on the water, there is a satisfaction you would be hard-pressed to find anywhere else after a long and strenuous season.

Vessels are 32’ feet long, about the same length as two cars parked in line. A little over half of that distance is working deck space which leaves very little space for living quarters. With an average crew of 4 people, space is extremely tight and there is just enough room for 4 bunks and a small galley. Remember though, you are in Bristol Bay to fish, not sleep. Days are long and there is no set schedule-sometimes you begin to fish at 4:00 pm; other times the fish call at 4:00 am. It is this lack of predictability that can be both exhilarating and exhausting for a crew. There isn’t time to worry about much more than eating and basic personal hygiene, especially during peak season. Baby wipes become a primary form of bathing and when you do find downtime to take a shower after a week or more of hard work, it can feel like a life changing experience. It is safe to say you really get to know your crewmembers after 6 weeks of living within arms reach of each other. 

Working on deck is an intense experience. Your hands are blistered and raw – your eyes crusty from the 45-minute nap snuck in while there is a lull in intensity. But, when the majority of fish are making their way from the ocean, and the captain is barking orders from the flybridge, you get a surge of energy because you know NOW is the time to catch as many fish as possible. Rain may be blowing sideways in brisk heavy wind and rough seas easily toss the boat around, but you slip on a dry pair of socks, put on your rain gear, and get to work. 

Occasionally though, the rough seas calm down and the clouds open up to expose some sunshine. Feeling the warmth of the sun on your skin after standing in the rain for weeks, or fishing under a vivid sunset of pink and orange at 1:00 am brings a smile of joy to your face. Adding a fresh brewed cup of coffee makes the feeling that much better, it is the fuel that keeps you going through those long and exhausting days.

You feel the most satisfaction when the season comes to an end and you reflect on what it took to catch 250k+ lbs of sockeye. There are many moments while on the water that a feeling of uncertainty lingers. Will the fish show up? Many fishermen depend on this income to get them through the rest of the year, so things that threaten the return of sockeye, such as Pebble Mine, truly do feel daunting. We are betting on mother nature after all, right?  

It is the many facets of Bristol Bay, difficult and thrilling, that keep us coming back. Fishing is in our blood and we are proud to be the fisherman bringing wild caught salmon from our nets to your table. Thank you for your continued support of what we do!

Cheers,

The folks at Pride of Bristol Bay

Cooked fillet of bristol bay sockeye salmon

Direct to Door opens Monday 9/23

A reminder for you! 

Our Direct to Door program will be open for orders of 2019 Bristol Bay sockeye portions and fillets Monday, September 23rd. After another successful fishing season, we are ready to offer the high quality sockeye you have been waiting for. Stock your freezer with our 20 lb. case (or save a little room for ice cream,) with our NEW 10lb. case. Whichever option you choose, both are shipped directly to your door for FREE!

We have also been working closely this year with our processor, Leader Creek Fisheries, to make significant improvements on the durability of the packaging of our products by increasing the thickness of vacuum packs and reinforcing the seals (more on this coming soon).  We remain dedicated to providing the freshest, highest quality salmon delivered from our nets to your door!   

Be on the lookout for our newsletter announcing the launch on Monday. If you don’t already subscribe, you can sign up at the bottom of our homepage to begin receiving our most up to date information, recipes and news from Bristol Bay! 

Cheers!

The Folks at Pride of Bristol Bay

Wild Sockeye

Wild Sockeye Salmon Coming Direct to Your Door

Dear loyal customers and wild salmon lovers,

We are thrilled to announce that — in just a few short weeks — we will begin shipping our wild-caught, Bristol Bay Sockeye fillets and portions directly to your door. We had another fantastic summer harvesting Sockeye salmon in Bristol Bay and the resource is as strong as ever. In Alaska, the overall statewide harvest of Sockeye salmon produced as expected and we continue to be confident in the sustainability efforts supported by the fishermen.

As many of you know, we source our Sockeye salmon exclusively from Leader Creek Fisheries, the company to whom our team of fishermen delivers their product. Every Leader Creek fisherman is fiercely dedicated to producing the very highest quality product at the point of harvest.

 We are your fishermen, and we take enormous pride in our work. Through ongoing effort and devotion to our chosen work, we have been able to increase the amount of salmon we can secure and pass along to our customers through our Direct to Door program.

On another note, there are new things coming this year, and we’re thrilled to tell you about them! First, we are introducing 10-pound cases into our Direct to Door program. So beginning this fall you’ll now have the opportunity to order either 10 or 20-pound cases of fillets or portions, to be delivered directly to your door. Second, we heard you! This season we have improved our packaging. This is an exciting point for us, not only because this new packaging is going to preserve the flavors of Bristol Bay even more, but also because you’ll get to experience the highest quality quality fish at your door step.

. . .and now. . .
. . .DRUM ROLL PLEASE. . .


We will begin accepting orders for our fresh frozen, wild-caught, Bristol Bay Sockeye fillets and portions on Monday, September 23rd. We will begin shipping on Monday, September 30th.

 
Keep an eye out for an email about the opening of the Direct to Door program! In the meantime, happy beginning of fall and we’ll be back in touch soon.
Cheers,
The Folk at Pride of Bristol Bay